mumfordmania:

College Kid Marcus Haney Lived a Real-Life Version of Almost Famous
He made a documentary about his time on the road with Mumford & Sons
In 2010, Marcus Haney was your typical college kid with a lust to get closer to the core of any modern music-lover’s dream — the music festival. But unlike most people wanting to go to Coachella, Bonnaroo and the rest, Haney didn’t save for weeks to buy his event pass, and then ride out to Indio with his buddies for a weekend of partying to Jay-Z and Muse in the audience. Instead, Haney rode out to Indio, jumped a fence when no one was looking, hid out in a Porta-Potty for 8 hours and used a homemade photo pass to enjoy Coachella not from the audience with everyone else, but rather from behind the lens as a press photographer.And while there might be quite a few people who successfully sneak into Coachella and other big music festivals for a day or so, Haney made a career out of it. He eventually parlayed his fake photo pass and press credentials to sneak into multiple festivals over a couple of years. At one such event, he met Mumford and Sons, who took such a liking to Haney and his work they invited him to go on tour with them as their press photographer. Haney dropped out of USC film school one term before graduating so he could join one of the world’s biggest rock bands on their tour.
Haney has turned his adventures into a documentary film, No Cameras Allowed. The footage he shot at festivals and on the road with Mumford and Sons has been edited into a full-length film premiering July 23 at the Wiltern Theater in Los Angeles.
We sat down with Haney, now 26 and living in Venice Beach when he’s not on the road, to talk about what it’s like to be the badass who realized his dream one amazing concert at a time.
OC Weekly (Tina Dhamija): Did you go into this business of sneaking into concerts as press with any initial intent to become a music photographer?
Marcus Haney: I never aspired to be a music photographer, I’ve always aspired to be filmmaker. I mostly just wanted to hear music and used the camera as a prop to be there, as a decoy. Yes, now after I got to invited to go on a train across country, tour with the band and get to shoot whatever I wanted, I thought, “Okay, this is a pretty cool career.”
No Cameras Allowed is kind of like an Almost Famous for this generation, in that you sneak into the show and eventually make your way into the world of touring and chronicling what you encounter along the way. Have you ever seen that movie or met Cameron Crowe?
Actually, I have not seen Almost Famous yet, but I have met Cameron Crowe. We’ve hung out before and traded multiple stories about the road.
Let’s talk about touring with Mumford and Sons. What was that part of the journey like for you, to become such an intimate part of the road with such a popular band?
It was great, just pretty much surreal. I learned a lot, I gained an amazing family on the road, and I got to see a lot of the world. It was an incredible experience and still is.
What are you currently working on?
I currently just dropped a music video for the band Bear’s Den out of London. They’re good friends of mine and have an incredible album coming out.
What’s next for you, personally and professionally? Are you planning to go back to USC to finish your film degree, or do you have something else in mind?
Finishing my degree is definitely not my first priority. Making more movies, traveling with bigger and crazier bands… . I want to do more photography and film. My feature film is almost finished.
What would be the ultimate show for you to get into, one that you have not done yet?
I don’t think there is one. I think I’ve gotten into everything I’ve wanted to. As far as the future, it’s not just music. I want to get back to doing narrative films, scripted films. I have some art-music documentary ideas that I’m exploring in the next year or so.
How has your family been handling your lifestyle?
It has taken a while, but my family is very supportive now.
What do you consider a luxury in your life?

Time is a good one, and hanging out at home is another one. Actually, spending time hanging out at home is a luxury for me.
For more information about No Cameras Allowed or to attend Wednesday’s premiere at the Wiltern Theater, please visit the event’s Facebook page.
Watch the trailer here, featuring Mumford & Sons: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPRstX6iiLE
http://blogs.ocweekly.com/heardmentality/2014/07/no_cameras_allowed_marcus_haney_interview_coachella_mumford_and_sons.php

mumfordmania:

College Kid Marcus Haney Lived a Real-Life Version of Almost Famous

He made a documentary about his time on the road with Mumford & Sons

In 2010, Marcus Haney was your typical college kid with a lust to get closer to the core of any modern music-lover’s dream — the music festival. But unlike most people wanting to go to Coachella, Bonnaroo and the rest, Haney didn’t save for weeks to buy his event pass, and then ride out to Indio with his buddies for a weekend of partying to Jay-Z and Muse in the audience. Instead, Haney rode out to Indio, jumped a fence when no one was looking, hid out in a Porta-Potty for 8 hours and used a homemade photo pass to enjoy Coachella not from the audience with everyone else, but rather from behind the lens as a press photographer.

And while there might be quite a few people who successfully sneak into Coachella and other big music festivals for a day or so, Haney made a career out of it. He eventually parlayed his fake photo pass and press credentials to sneak into multiple festivals over a couple of years. At one such event, he met Mumford and Sons, who took such a liking to Haney and his work they invited him to go on tour with them as their press photographer. Haney dropped out of USC film school one term before graduating so he could join one of the world’s biggest rock bands on their tour.

Haney has turned his adventures into a documentary film, No Cameras Allowed. The footage he shot at festivals and on the road with Mumford and Sons has been edited into a full-length film premiering July 23 at the Wiltern Theater in Los Angeles.

We sat down with Haney, now 26 and living in Venice Beach when he’s not on the road, to talk about what it’s like to be the badass who realized his dream one amazing concert at a time.

OC Weekly (Tina Dhamija): Did you go into this business of sneaking into concerts as press with any initial intent to become a music photographer?

Marcus Haney: I never aspired to be a music photographer, I’ve always aspired to be filmmaker. I mostly just wanted to hear music and used the camera as a prop to be there, as a decoy. Yes, now after I got to invited to go on a train across country, tour with the band and get to shoot whatever I wanted, I thought, “Okay, this is a pretty cool career.”

No Cameras Allowed is kind of like an Almost Famous for this generation, in that you sneak into the show and eventually make your way into the world of touring and chronicling what you encounter along the way. Have you ever seen that movie or met Cameron Crowe?

Actually, I have not seen Almost Famous yet, but I have met Cameron Crowe. We’ve hung out before and traded multiple stories about the road.

Let’s talk about touring with Mumford and Sons. What was that part of the journey like for you, to become such an intimate part of the road with such a popular band?

It was great, just pretty much surreal. I learned a lot, I gained an amazing family on the road, and I got to see a lot of the world. It was an incredible experience and still is.

What are you currently working on?

I currently just dropped a music video for the band Bear’s Den out of London. They’re good friends of mine and have an incredible album coming out.

What’s next for you, personally and professionally? Are you planning to go back to USC to finish your film degree, or do you have something else in mind?

Finishing my degree is definitely not my first priority. Making more movies, traveling with bigger and crazier bands… . I want to do more photography and film. My feature film is almost finished.

What would be the ultimate show for you to get into, one that you have not done yet?

I don’t think there is one. I think I’ve gotten into everything I’ve wanted to. As far as the future, it’s not just music. I want to get back to doing narrative films, scripted films. I have some art-music documentary ideas that I’m exploring in the next year or so.

How has your family been handling your lifestyle?

It has taken a while, but my family is very supportive now.

What do you consider a luxury in your life?

Time is a good one, and hanging out at home is another one. Actually, spending time hanging out at home is a luxury for me.

For more information about No Cameras Allowed or to attend Wednesday’s premiere at the Wiltern Theater, please visit the event’s Facebook page.

Watch the trailer here, featuring Mumford & Sons: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPRstX6iiLE

http://blogs.ocweekly.com/heardmentality/2014/07/no_cameras_allowed_marcus_haney_interview_coachella_mumford_and_sons.php

157 notes 

vaultnumber713:

I love them

they’re wondering what he’s looking for

(Source: catsbeaversandducks)

296,183 notes 

sixpenceee:

thebartolonomicron:

sixpenceee:

EVERYDAY THE SAME DREAM is an art game about alienation and refusal of labour. You are a faceless, unnamed man going about his business. The game has alternatives endings. Will you end up going to work and working in a little cubicle like every day, or will you take another route and do something different for once? 

PLAY IT HERE

You may also like: ENTITY

OK LEMME TALK ABOUT EVERY DAY THE SAME DREAM.

My history of game design teacher had us play through this game for ten minutes one class, and then played it on the projector.

At first no one seemed to really get it, it just seemed like a daily life simulator with catchy music (the music carries the game beautifully, don’t play it on mute if you can help it).

Then some of the other students began murmuring and questioning the point of the game after a few play throughs.

Yes, there are different ways to end the day, but the game has only one true ending, which is reached after ending the day every way possible.

Don’t judge the game by the minimalist graphics and simple gameplay mechanics. Every Day the Same Dream is a brilliantly crafted and for some a highly therapeutic experience.

Things you do one day can and often will affect the following days, (your wife leaves you, the homeless man vanishes, you lose your job, etc.) Until you’re left with only one final option, which I won’t spoil.

To paraphrase my professor, this game makes you look for a deeper meaning, not just in the game but also in yourself. It takes you to a place within yourself you need to be to understand yourself and how you interact with the real world.
Play it all the way through and see for yourself.

I think everyone needs to hear this

i gave up too early,  i had to go back and try again,  keep going, you will know when its really over.

45,497 notes 

thefrogman:

Poorly Drawn Dinosaurs by Henrik Tomenius [website | twitter]

165,759 notes 

skittyblackfire:

This is the link: https://soundcloud.com/hiatus/soundtrack-mix
I swear to you, this is exactly the perfect music for this very moment. How did he know?! :P

I have a horrible time trying to sleep, I put this on while reading and it legit helped knock me out in a way those fake rain and storm tracks dont. its stimulation without being overwhelming.

skittyblackfire:

This is the link: https://soundcloud.com/hiatus/soundtrack-mix

I swear to you, this is exactly the perfect music for this very moment. How did he know?! :P

I have a horrible time trying to sleep, I put this on while reading and it legit helped knock me out in a way those fake rain and storm tracks dont. its stimulation without being overwhelming.

19 notes 

germanladybug1980:

jaimehang:

Andrew Bird - Headsoak (ft. Laura Marling and Marcus Mumford)

Oh MY GAWD…

119 notes 

The Apache Relay! - Katie Queen of Tennessee

1 note 

wheres-the-folking-popcorn:

mumfordandsonsblog:

Mumford & Sons perform a slightly… different version of “Winter Winds” for BBC Radio 2’s The Radcliffe and Maconie Show on 26th November 2009. Enjoy!

THE WAY MARCUS DANCES TO IT AND TED LAUGHGING

well, y’all bitches must know that i now expect reggae on the new album.

778 notes 

It has been years since I have been Rick Rolled,  It just happened and i was so surprised that I actually sat there and watched the whole thing feeling slightly charmed. 

crazy-fish-lady:

picassothebetta:

milkofmarrow:

smallstrawhat:

trillgamesh:

this is one of the sweetest videos ive ever seen

this lizard’s name is peperonie this is the most amazing video on the internet

please watch this

So I can’t stop smiling.

This was really cute!!

39,993 notes 

ezrakoeni-g:

sheeran:

this never fails to make me laugh

this is on my wall this is literally taped to my wall

ezrakoeni-g:

sheeran:

this never fails to make me laugh

this is on my wall this is literally taped to my wall

(Source: dulldrops)

3,013 notes 

pallidus-folium:

perks-of-being-sian:

this is the best thing since sliced bread I’m not kidding

awwwwwww

(Source: karisikcerez)

118,241 notes